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MODERN LANGUAGES


FRENCH AND GERMAN AT GCSE

These are optional subjects for examination at GCSE. You may choose to do one language or continue with both at GCSE.



ASSESSMENT

GCSE French and German consist of exams in each of the four skills:

Speaking 30%. It will consist of two tasks marked by teacher, moderated by examining board.

Writing 30%. Students prepare and complete two tasks under supervision, which is marked by the examining board.

Listening 20%. This will involve understanding authentic material recorded on a tape or CD by native French speakers. Choice of Foundation or Higher Level. Marked by Examining Board.

Reading 20%. You will have to understand written material such as newspaper articles, public notices, letters, emails, etc. Choice of Foundation or Higher Level. Marked by Examining Board.


Pupils choose to enter either at Foundation or at Higher Level for the Reading and Listening. It is possible to enter at different levels in different skills but, in practice, most pupils will enter at Higher Level in all four.



TOPICS

The emphasis of the whole course is on authenticity and communication. That means that pupils will be dealing with exactly the kind of things they will be faced with when they go to a French or German speaking country and will be learning to make themselves understood, and in turn to understand. It is also hoped that they will gain an insight into the way of life in French or German speaking countries. The opportunity to take part in a school exchange will also be offered.



Relationships: Families and Friends

Local Environment: advantages and disadvantages

Activities: daily routine and leisure

Health and lifestyle: diet, exercise and illness

Travel and tourism: destinations and choice

Social issues: problems in society and equality

Environmental issues: litter, transport, energy, conservation and recycling

Media and communications

Celebrations: festivals and customs

School life

Part-time jobs: advantages and disadvantages

Future plans: choice and expectations



CAREER NOTE:

Learning a language will bring you a wide range of skills and attributes which are highly sought after by employers and universities: these include communication, interpersonal and problem-solving skills which are required for the world of work. A qualification in a language can prove to be advantageous to those seeking employment in many different areas, not just the traditional fields of teaching, tourism, government and marketing, but also in areas such as financial services, IT, journalism, engineering, business, law, agriculture and the Armed Forces.

A language is also a practical qualification which can be used in life – if you travel anywhere or want to move jobs for promotion you will use a language.

A pass in a language at GCSE is essential for entry to some universities. Languages carry more points for gaining entry to universities than a number of other subjects.

French and German can be studied at university alongside other Modern Languages, or can be combined with the study of accounting, economics, European Studies, engineering, medicine and many other degree pathways.



C Bersot

Head of Modern Foreign Languages Department






FRENCH

Advised entry requirements

It is important to have reached a high standard in all four skills (speaking, reading, writing and listening) and to have obtained an A*, A or B at GCSE.

Overall view of the course

The course aims to develop proficiency in the four skills examined at GCSE (listening, speaking, reading and writing) to a much higher level and also to introduce you to aspects of French society and culture (both literary and non-literary). You will read and discuss articles from textbooks, newspapers and magazines on a variety of French news and current affairs. At AS Level you will read and discuss articles and listen to recordings on a wide selection of themes, including relationships, health and fitness, travel, citizenship and current affairs. At A2 Level more complex and mature issues are examined, such as the Media and their influence on society, the environment, prejudice, racism, Europe, violence and conflict, democracy and human rights, to name but a few. During the two years you will have regular weekly classes with a French assistant where you will have the opportunity to improve your ability to speak fluently and understand spoken French at normal speeds.

AS Level.    The course is of one year's duration and has three modules:

35%    -   Oral. Consisting of Presentation, and Conversation.
65%    -  Reading and Listening Comprehension, and Translation into English.
            -   Writing, in the French language.


A Level. The A2 course with a further three modules builds on the AS year, the results of which account for 50% of your final A Level assessment. In order to progress from AS to A2 pupils should have achieved at least a Grade C at AS.

        - Oral. This consists of Discussion and Conversation. This accounts for 17½% of the final A Level assessment.
        - Reading and Listening Comprehension, and Translation into French. This accounts for 17½% of the final A Level assessment.
        - Literature. This will involve the study of a literary text. This element will account for 15% of the final A Level assessment.
 


Career note. French can be studied at university alongside other Modern Languages, or can be combined with the study of accounting, economics, European Studies, engineering, medicine and many other degree pathways.
Advanced skills in French can prove to be advantageous to those seeking employment in many different areas, not just the traditional fields of teaching, tourism, government and marketing, but also in areas such as financial services, IT, journalism, engineering, business, law, agriculture and the Armed Forces.
Many study French for the sheer pleasure of being able to communicate with and enjoy the Francophone cultures and traditions world-wide (whether in N. America, many parts of Africa, and the Far East, or closer to home in Belgium, Switzerland or France itself.).


C BERSOT.
MFL Coordinator



German Exchange Trip to Bielefeld

The most recent trip to Bielefeld took place in September 2013 when 30 pupils travelled from Fermanagh to visit our partner school, Brackweder Gymnasium and spent 10 days with their host families. Recruitment for the next trip will start in the Spring Term with places offered to current year 9 pupils. We look forward to welcoming our German partners back to Fermanagh in September 2014!

Click the link below to visit our partner school’s website and their review and photos of the most recent exchange trip.

http://www.brackwedergymnasium.de/fahrten/enniskillen/546-nordirische-austauschpartner-zu-besuch-waehrend-des-50jaehrigen-schuljubilaeums.html

And take a look at our Exchanges page to see some photos from the trip! click here


French Exchange Trip to Lyon


In December 2012, a group of six AS students went on an exchange trip to Lyon. They stayed with French students for ten days, got to spend some time in a French Lycée and discovered the city of Lyon during its very famous light festival: “La Fête des Lumières”.

The boys were welcomed in Lyon airport by their exchange partners on Friday 7th December. Everyone was a bit nervous about spending a whole weekend with families they did not know, with whom they were only to speak French! Over the weekend the pupils went to La Fête des Lumières, were immersed in the local culture and saw some spectacular light projections on the most famous buildings of the city such as the City Hall, Saint Jean Cathedral or Célestins theatre. Within four days, La fête des Lumières gathered three million visitors! Our students were really impressed.

During the week the group met at the high school every morning and then went to some different places in the city. Mr Bersot (PRS), originally from Lyon, was a very efficient tour guide! The group had the privilege to visit Lyon City Hall; a rarity as it is usually closed to visitors. They got the opportunity to go to a football match (Olympique Lyonnais-Nancy) and also visited the Institut Lumière Museum as well as a Vintage car museum in Rochetaillée.
Aside from all these visits, the boys got to spend an afternoon in class and experience a French student’s school life, surrounded by boys and girls with no uniform!

Lyon is also really famous for food; the boys were encouraged to try a bit of everything. Mr Bersot advised them: “Do not ask what it is, just try it!” Most followed his advice and were brave enough to try some escargots (snails) as well as huîtres (oysters) and the famous local quenelle (fish dish).

In the end the whole group was very positive about this experience. Everyone made some new friends and discovered some new aspects about French culture and language. This experience helped the AS students to improve their oral comprehension as well as oral expression. They are all now looking forward to February 2013 when their French partners are coming to Enniskillen!

Nathalie Llorens (French Assistant 2011-13)








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lyon2


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GERMAN

Advised entry requirements

It is important to have reached a high standard in all four skills (speaking, reading, writing and listening) and to have obtained an A*, A or B at GCSE.

Overall view of the course
The four skills will be developed to a higher level; the course will help pupils to develop general skills, to communicate at a higher level in German and to learn much more about German society. In addition to normal classes, pupils will usually have 1 period of conversation with the German assistant.

AS Level  Study will be concentrated on three main topic areas:
        - Relationships (family life and relationships, personal and interpersonal relationships)
        - Health and Lifestyle (physical and mental well-being, interests)
        - Young people in society (influences on young people, education and career planning)

At the end of the year there are two assessments:
1. Speaking : a presentation lasting 3 minutes, followed by a 10 minute general conversation with the examiner about yourself (home, school, hobbies, future plans).
2. Listening, Reading and Writing:
(i) listening: pupils answer two questions based on two recorded passages. Each pupil has his own CD.
(ii) reading: two reading comprehension questions based on one text, followed by a translation into English.
(iii) writing: pupils write an essay response (200-250 words) to a stimulus text.


A Level Two further topic areas are studied:
        - Local and Global Citizenship (equality, multicultural society, democracy and conflict)
        - Environmental Awareness (conservation, energy, climate change)

Pupils also study a German play and a film.
There are two exams at the end of the year:

1. Speaking : a discussion about the film studied, followed by a general conversation (total duration 15mins).

2. Listening, Reading and Writing:
(i) listening: pupils answer two questions based on two recorded passages. Each pupil has his own CD.
(ii) reading: pupils answer three questions based on two texts, followed by a translation into German.
(iii) writing: pupils answer one essay question based on the play studied (300-350words).


Career note. German can be studied at university alongside other Modern Languages, or can be combined with the study of accounting, economics, European Studies, engineering, medicine and many other degree pathways.
Advanced skills in German can prove to be advantageous to those seeking employment in many different areas, not just the traditional fields of teaching, tourism, government and marketing, but also in areas such as financial services, IT, journalism, engineering, business, law, agriculture and the Armed Forces.
A language is also a practical qualification which can be used in life – if you travel anywhere or want to move jobs for promotion you will use a language.


J DONALD.
German Teacher