Wholeschool Portal | Home 12 December 2017

          Email us!
 
 History
    History


Staff

Mr S. Gaston
Mr P. McCallum




Key Stage 3

In years 8-10, students study a broad sweep of British, Irish and European history, starting with the Norman Conquest of England and Ireland and finishing in the twentieth century. In year 8, topics include medieval castles, feudalism, the Black Death, the Reformation and Mary, Queen of Scots.

Moving into year 9, students study the Ulster Plantation, the Spanish Armada, the Battle of the Boyne and the development of nationalism and unionism in nineteenth century Ireland. In year 10, students examine the events that led to the partition of Ireland and then go on to look at various aspects of twentieth century History, such as the First World War and the Holocaust.

In year 8, our pupils get the chance to visit Carrickfergus Castle and, in year 10, there is a field trip to the Somme Heritage Centre. In the past few years, year ten students have also entered the History section of Fermanagh Feis.




GCSE


Why is a GCSE History qualification useful to me and why might I go on to study it at Advanced Level?

According to the Russell Group of 20 leading universities in the United Kingdom, the study of History at Advanced Level (and obviously GCSE beforehand) is useful for entry into university courses such as American Studies, Archaeology, Classical Studies, English, European Studies, French, German, History, History of Art, Italian, Law, Politics, Religious Studies/Theology, Spanish & Teacher Training, including Primary Teaching.

History is a highly respected, traditional academic subject. At Advanced Level, the Russell Group consider it to be one of the so-called ‘facilitating subjects’, which are “subjects that are required more often than others” for entry into their universities. The Russell Group also suggest that History is one of the ‘hard’ subjects, i.e. traditional and theoretical, whereas ‘soft’ subjects have a vocational or practical bias.

The transferable skills taught through History are highly valued in the workplace and by employers. Research undertaken by Professor David Nicholls of Manchester Metropolitan University has revealed that historians do, in fact, provide more directors of Britain’s leading companies in proportion to the number of graduates than any other subject, outperforming law, science and engineering.


What will I study?

Northern Ireland, 1963 – 1985

Including:


  • Why the troubles started in 1969.
  • Why ‘Bloody Sunday’ remains such a controversial event.
  • Why loyalists organised a general strike in 1974.
  • Why ten republicans died on hunger strike in 1981.
  • Why Ian Paisley said “never, never, never” in 1985.

Russia and the Soviet Union, 1914-1945

Including:


  • How World War I led to the downfall of the Russian royal family.
  • Why there were two revolutions in Russia in 1917.
  • Why Joseph Stalin was happy for millions of Russians to die under his rule.
  • How the Soviet Union defeated Nazi Germany in World War II.

The Cold War

Including:


  • Soviet takeover of Eastern Europe
  • Berlin Blockade & Airlift
  • Korean War
  • Berlin Wall
  • Vietnam War
  • Fall of communism in Europe

Controlled Assessment
  • Currently on the Vietnam War

What examinations do I have to take?

Paper 1 (50%) – Northern Ireland and Russia – Structured factual recall questions – Taken at the end of Year 11, with the opportunity to repeat at the end of Year 12.

Paper 2 (25%) – Cold War – 1 essay (from a choice of 3) and 1 source question – Taken at the end of Year 12.

Controlled Assessment (25%) – Completed in class during Year 12.



Why should I study GCSE History?

  • Because I like History
  • Because I am good at History
  • Because I will develop transferable skills in areas such as written communication, organisation of information and analysis of sources
  • Because I will have the opportunity to get a good grade if I work hard

2012 Portora GCSE History Results
(Cumulative Percentages)


A*
A
B
C
15.8
50
89.5
100


2012 Provisional CCEA GCSE History Statistics for males in Grammar Schools (Cumulative Percentages)

A*
A
B
C
16
43.4
74.8
91.7



A-Level


Why is an Advanced Level History qualification useful to me?

According to the Russell Group of 20 leading universities in the United Kingdom, the study of History at Advanced Level is useful for entry into university courses, such as American Studies, Archaeology, Classical Studies, English, European Studies, French, German, History, History of Art, Italian, Law, Politics, Religious Studies/Theology, Spanish & Teacher Training, including Primary Teaching.

History is a highly respected, traditional academic subject.  At Advanced Level, the Russell Group consider it to be one of the so-called ‘facilitating subjects’, which are “subjects that are required more often than others” for entry into their universities.  The Russell Group also suggest that History is one of the ‘hard’ subjects, i.e. traditional and theoretical, whereas ‘soft’ subjects have a vocational or practical bias.

The transferable skills taught through History are highly valued in the workplace and by employers. Research undertaken by Professor David Nicholls of Manchester Metropolitan University has revealed that historians do, in fact, provide more directors of Britain’s leading companies in proportion to the number of graduates than any other subject, outperforming law, science and engineering.



What will I study?

AS Level

AS1: Germany 1918-1945
&
AS2: Italy 1914-1943

A2 Level

Either
A21: Nationalism & Unionism 1800-1900
&
A22: Partition of Ireland 1900-1925

Or

A21: Anglo-Spanish Relations 1509-1609
&
A22: Ireland 1607-1691

The A2 options offered will depend on what teacher is teaching A Level in a particular year.



What examinations do I have to take?

AS1 (50% of AS; 25% of A2) – two source questions and an essay – 1hr 30mins – sat in January of Year 13

AS2 (50% of AS; 25% of A2) – two short and two long essays - 1hr 30mins – sat in June of Year 13

A21 (20% of A2) – one essay - 1hr 15mins – sat in January of Year 14

A22 (30% of A2) – two source questions and an essay – 2hrs – sat in May of Year 14


  • All modules, apart from A22, can be taken more than once.
  • There is no coursework in A-Level History

Why should I study A-Level History?

  • Because I like History
  • Because I am good at History
  • Because I will develop transferable skills in areas such as written communication, organisation of information and analysis of sources
  • Because I will have the opportunity to get a good grade if I work hard

No. of candidates (2012)

A*    

A    
B    
C    
D    

% Grades A-E

18

7

7

2

1

1

100


In 2012, candidates had, on average, a positive ALIS residual of +0.6.